Tips for parents on their child’s soccer game

When playing football, all the attention of young footballers is focused on the task of which maneuver to make and how to score a goal.
However, at the same time, the player’s attention may be distracted by loudly ailing parents who shout instructions on how to score a goal or necessary blow from the sideline. Of course, parents do this solely out of good intentions for their child, but such behavior can have a negative impact on a young athlete.

STOP TEACHING YOUR CHILD TO PLAY WHILE HE’S PLAYING.

A common problem in youth football is emotional parents who sit in the stands and try to tell the young athlete how to play. This is especially difficult for the child if the parent’s instructions go against the coach’s instructions. Try to imagine yourself in a room with people who are constantly shouting some words – perhaps this will be the exact feeling of how the child feels during the match.

Usually, parents scream louder and even more aggressively than the coach. The coach brings the instructions to the children from the position of the teacher, he wants to improve the level of the whole team, this is part of his job. Parents, on the other hand, shout instructions only to their child and want to get the result instantly. This is different from what the coach requires.

DO NOT JUDGE BY A JUDGE.

Spectators in the stands and behind the TV screen should understand that judges can also make mistakes – even the highest class referees. When parents start arguing with the judge over what they believe to be wrong, they turn the game between children into a lawsuit between adults.

The judge works objectively based on what he sees. The parent will interpret the same situation in favor of the team for which the child is playing. If it’s a decision that harms the team’s results, then parents will automatically look subjective. The problem arises when parents react aggressively to the judge’s comments. The child sees this and thinks that it is customary to do so. Parents should remember that they are always a role model for their child.

FOCUS ON GOOD MOMENTS OF THE GAME, NOT ON THE ACCOUNT.

Too often, parents worry about the numbers on the scoreboard, forgetting about the experience their child gets every minute of the game. And although it is a natural desire – to want a victory for the team of your child – but you should look at the match more broadly, without getting hung up on the score.

If the team did not win, think about what it takes to come out the next time and show the best result? Coaches in any sport take the position that defeat is part of the process. If your team always wins, then the team will not be able to adequately respond to the loss, and it will be hard for the child to experience setbacks that always happen from time to time. Losing is a big step in the development of a child as a football player and as an individual.

After the game, very few parents ask their son what moments he most remembered. The child gets used to seeing the parents’ reaction to the outcome of the game for granted. A vicious connection is formed between the result of the match and the conclusions that the child makes for himself. Such an experience is unambiguously counterproductive for a young footballer.

RESPOND CORRECTLY TO THE PARENTS OF THE OPPONENT TEAM.

Adults should go to their child’s tournament in order to enjoy his game and without any confrontation. Parents are representatives not only of the football school, but also of their young athlete. Imagine that your son sees the way you are behaving right now. What would you think? Are you proud of your behavior? Would you allow your child to behave the same way?

DO NOT CROW YOURSELF BEFORE PLAYING.

Go to the game and enjoy it. See what your child is doing on the field. This is his game, not yours. There is no need to tie your emotional state to what is happening in front of the podium. Take a look at your child. Does he like the field? Does he show leadership qualities? Is he comfortable with his teammates? Don’t worry about the rest. Take a broader view of things. There are more important things in life. For example, your child.

LEAVE ANY QUESTIONS TO THE COACH BEFORE THE NEXT WORKOUT.

Maybe you disagree with how much your child spent on the field or with any of the coach’s decisions during the match. It takes time to think about such situations, and not make claims to the coach and put the coach against the child and the team.

Immediately after the game, parents should not approach the coach. Talking on emotions will not bring results. In addition, the coach also experiences every second of the match and will not be able to give an adequate answer to your questions. Go home. Talk with your family about the past game, and then go to bed. Contact the trainer at the next lesson and in a calm atmosphere ask the questions you are interested in and get his feedback.

Oliver

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